‹ Back to

Category: march 2017 (18 posts)


| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
LawCare - Keeping Fit in a Sedentary Job Keeping Fit in a Sedentary Job Physical inactivity currently costs the NHS in England around £1.8 billion per year, and around £8.3 billion to the wider economy in sick days and premature deaths 1. For lawyers working long hours in a job which essentially involves sitting at a desk all day, being active and keeping fit can be a challenge.   Walking is one of the easiest ways to meet your physical activity recommendations; it’s cheap, requires no special equipment, and has a low risk of injury. Walking regularly at any speed can help to manage weight, boost the immune system and even reduce the risk of some cancers as well as osteoporosis. Brisk walking has even more benefits, including lowering blood pressure, improving heart and lung health, and raising mood.   The rise in popularity of wearable fitness trackers means that there’s probably someone in your workplace who is trying to get in their recommended 10,000 steps per day (including 250 per hour). Even if that’s not you, walking as much as possible throughout the day isn’t as difficult as you might imagine. The standard advice to take the stairs not the lift, and get off the bus/tube/tram a stop early or park further away has been oft-repeated, but once you’re at your desk, how can you factor those extra steps into your day? Always volunteer for the coffee run. Then collect up the dirty cups afterwards and take them to the kitchen. Set your default printer to one on a different floor. Drink plenty of water (which has its own health benefits), and use a toilet on the other side of the building. Stand up and walk around when on the phone. Not only will it help with your step count, but standing when you speak can make you sound more confident and authoritative. Go for a walk in your lunch break. Make the most of your fitness tracker. Many prompt you to move each hour. If yours doesn’t or you don’t have one, set an alarm on Google or ...

| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
News from the Devon & Somerset Junior Lawyers' Division This month's article has been written by the JLD's National Representative, Georgia Wookey.As National Representative of the Devon and Somerset JLD, I provide a voice to our members at National JLD level by meeting my counterparts from JLDs across England and Wales at the Law Society, London, three times a year. We last met at the end of January 2017 and as expected at the top of the agenda for discussion was the SRA's proposal for the introduction of the solicitors qualifying exam (SQE). 6 January marked the close of the SRA's second consultation into the introduction of the SQE and I understand that there may be a third consultation on its way later this year. The JLD encourage everyone to take part and respond either as firms or as individuals as the introduction of the SQE will mark a huge change to  entry in to the legal profession.  Should you wish to see the full consultation paper please visit https://www.sra.org.uk/sra/consultations/solicitors-qualifying-examination.page     In general, the JLD is supportive of the idea of a centralised solicitors qualifying exam regulated by the SRA - at present each academic provider delivers its own program for the LPC which means there is variation and no consistency in the academic stage of training undertaken by current trainee solicitors. However there are a few concerns and suggestions which the JLD raises in its response to the consultation, three of which are:-     1) Work experience element - , the JLD would like to see a minimum of two years 'work experience' which should be split across no more than four separate placements, comparative to the current training contract system.  The time spent in each placement should be of a sufficient standard to actually equip junior lawyers with the necessary legal skills for when they qualify as solicitors and not merely give them 'the opportunity' to gain legal skills.     2) Preparatory...

| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
President's Charity - Thanks for amazing support   THANKS FOR AMAZING SUPPORT THROUGHOUT CHARITABLE PARTNERSHIP   North Devon Hospice has been named as charity of the year for the Devon & Somerset Law Society, as nominated by President Mark Roome. We are coming to the end of a fantastic year-long partnership between North Devon Hospice and the Devon and Somerset Law Society.   Society President, Mark Roome, chose the hospice as his charity of the year having seen at close quarters just what a different their care makes to local patients and families, all of whom are affected by life-limiting illnesses such as cancer.   Chief Executive of North Devon Hospice, Stephen Roberts, thanked members of DASLS for their tremendous support throughout the year. “This has been a very fruitful partnership, where some really fun opportunities have been taken up by members, and in turn, vital funds have been raised for the hospice. We’ve seen Society members get down and dirty by taking part in our Mission:Unbreakable commando challenge event, and also donate generously at the annual Somerset dinner. It was an honour to attend this year and speak to you all about how your support allows us to care for local people going through the toughest of times.”   Mark Roome said of the charity of the year partnership, “I’m very proud of the way that members of DASLS have taken this cause to their hearts and shown such generous support. North Devon Hospice is very dear to me, being based in the same town as my own practice. The care they provide is absolutely second to none, and there are few families in this area who have not been touched by their loving support down the years. It has been a pleasure to have the hospice as my charity of the year, and my thanks go out to all members who have shown such fantastic support.”   Stephen Roberts added, that to mark the end of the partnership, there was one more notable fundraising activity happening...

| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
Challenge Cup 2016/17 - and the winner is .... Congratulations to Michelmores Solicitors who have won the Devon & Somerset Law Society Challenge Cup for 2016/17. The DASLS Challenge Cup is a fun tournament of six competitive events held over a twelve month period commencing March of each year.   Law Firms or other groups of DASLS members may enter as many events as they choose, and different people may enter each event, depending on individual preferences.   This year teams have enjoyed events including Skittles, Footgolf, 5-a-Side Football, Pitch & Putt Golf, Ten Pin Bowling and a Quiz Night.   The Challenge Cup was presented at the Society's Annual Dinner & Legal Awards at Sandy Park, Exeter on 2nd March 2017.     Challenge Cup Quiz Night Report - well done Wollen Michelmore   For those who like their general knowledge tested you can’t beat a good old fashioned Pub Quiz.   DASLS Annual Challenge Cup Quiz on 26th January 2017 saw entrants agonise over which London landmark was designed so that it could act, albeit unsuccessfully as a giant telescope and from which country did different Coca Cola bottles originate from.   In the end it was the collective brains of Wollen Michelmore that took the title of DASLS Challenge Cup Quiz Champions 2017 – prestige that money can’t buy!   Congratulations also to Gilbert Stephens in second and WBW in third.   Everyone seemed to enjoy themselves, even if they didn’t know you sit in a Sulky when Harness Racing or that Megadeth were the trash metal band that released the album Dystopia. In fairness most didn’t actually know what trash metal is but did know that flamingos derived their colour from their diet of brine shrimp.   Thanks go to the Globe at Topsham which proved, once again, to be an excellent venue and to all the teams that entered and helped us raise £58 for DASLS President’s Charity; The North Devon Hospice.    ...

| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
Self Hacking aka Pen Testing by SPONSOR - Alchemy Self Hacking aka Pen Testing  Businesses are being exposed to an exponential number of potential threats, each of which could severely damage their reputation and their bottom line. But what can a firm do? Of course they can (and should) conduct regular risk assessments, adopt a multi-layer approach to cyber resilience, train their staff and keep them constantly updated on potential threats. But they should also use techniques such as Penetration (or Pen) Testing to determine how far a hacker could get into their business and then rapidly take steps to remedy any identified shortcomings.   Put simply Penetration Testing is a controlled way of trying to hack into your company’s systems to detect vulnerabilities.   Penetration testing goes further than vulnerability testing which simply aims to identify areas that are vulnerable to an attack - it seeks to gain as much access as possible to a company’s infrastructure, operating systems, applications, processes and people. It’s an extremely effective way for a firm to test the effectiveness of the policies, procedures and processes they’ve put in place to make their business as cyber resilient as possible.   How does Penetration Testing work?   Specialist firms are hired to legitimately attempt to breach an organisation’s defences, testing infrastructure, applications, networks, software, servers, firewalls, telephone equipment, VOIP, smartphones, tablets, printers. Yes, even printers can be a weak spot.   A combination of manual and automated technologies are used to systematically compromise servers, endpoints, web applications, wireless networks, network devices, and other potential points of exposure.   Penetration testing should be conducted internally and externally. External testing will identify avenues cyber criminals might take to access to your network and systems. An internal test looks for ways that information could ‘leak’...

| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
Merger-mania by SPONSOR Barclays Merger-mania: the truth behind the trends   As law firms face increased competition, pressure to lower fees and wider economic uncertainty, Andrea Delay, Head of Professional Services at Barclays, explores the potential behind the growing trend for consolidation and mergers.   The re-emergence of the legal community’s ‘mega-merger’ – in the form of the three-way tie-up between CMS, Nabarro and Olswang – has served to refocus attention on consolidation in a competitive sector facing downward pressure on fee income.   But in reality, despite these occasional unions, the legal landscape has not changed too dramatically in the past decade or so – notwithstanding the arrival in England and Wales of the ABS newcomers, the Alternative Business Structures that came in under the Legal Services Act of 2007.   However, anecdotal evidence suggests many firms across the sector are currently involved in merger discussions.   The market drivers   As Brexit and the political and economic changes in the US and Europe unfold over the coming months and years, ‘uncertainty’ remains the watchword. This has made it very difficult for a number of law firms to forecast and budget. But for the fleet of foot, opportunity knocks.   Many larger firms are either looking to expand their existing international reach or are considering building out an overseas presence and will turn a merger to their advantage. This, I believe, stems from the need to better service clients, where the trend, demonstrated by Barclays’ own procurement of legal services, is to achieve greater efficiency and focus on improving relationships.   In this context, a merger can help maintain a firm’s position. Not only does it remove one competitor, it can also provide economies of scale. Perhaps most importantly though, it facilitates the filling of any geographic or service gaps.   A warning   The obvious caveat in all this is that mergers...

| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
FRS 102 - Recognising income in law firms - is our firm doing it right? By SPONSOR PKF Francis Clark LLP Many partners in law firms will have the terms FRS 5 and UITF40 etched in their memories and will immediately recollect the cash flow horrors and transitional accounting complications of moving from a cash basis of accounting to a full accruals basis in respect on income. Whilst we all thought this issue was closed unfortunately more recent interpretations of a new accounting standard have called a specific, but important, part of income recognition in law firms into question again. Briefly, in terms of background, FRS 102 is an accounting standard that has now replaced FRS 5, UITF 40 and all other accounting standards. So FRS 102 becomes the relevant basis on which most law firms will prepare their accounts – certainly for tax purposes and where relevant for statutory reporting purposes. The area where FRS 102 changes the position compared to FRS 5 / UITF 40 is in respect of conditional fee agreements. Position under FRS 5 / UITF 40 At the balance sheet date if the matter contingency was met e.g. liability was admitted then the best estimate of the matter value at that time would be included in the accounts. For the purposes of valuing such matters post balance sheet events up to the point of signing off the accounts remain relevant. If the matter contingency was not met at the balance sheet date law firms had the option to include the unbilled time at either nil or cost. Post balance sheet events for matters where liability is not admitted at the balance sheet date were not relevant. Interpretation of position under FRS 102 Sector interpretation here has been evolving over the last year; the following summarises current common thinking:- The significance of the balance sheet date has been removed. The relevant point for assessing contingent fees is now the date the accounts are signed off. At this date if the contingency is ...

| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
Fixed Costs – Civil Procedure Rules Amendments The forthcoming amendments to the Civil Procedure Rules, which will be effective from 6 April 2017, include some significant amendments to the recovery of fixed costs in personal injury cases.   The particular rule in question is CPR 45.29, which sets out the amount of fixed costs that are recoverable in personal injury cases which have left the MOJ Portal. Although not expressly clear, the rules currently state that fixed costs will apply to cases with a value of less than £25,000. However, if the claim is valued at more than £25,000 then a Claimant is able to escape the fixed costs regime and recover costs on the standard basis.   However, following the Court of Appeal’s recent decision in Qader & Others v Esure Ltd & Khan v McGee [2016] EWCA Civ 1109, 16 November 2016, the Civil Procedure Rules Committee has sought to provide clarification as to when fixed costs do and do not apply.   From 6 April 2017, rule 45.29 will now read “subject to rules 45.29F, 45.29G, 45.29H and 45.29J,   and for as long as the case is not allocated to the multi-track,   if, in a claim started under the RTA Protocol, the Claim Notification Form is submitted on or after 31st July 2013, the only costs allowed are…”     Furthermore, all references to the upper limit of £25,000 as set out in Tables 6B and 6C are to be removed.   The practical effect of this is that if you have a claim that exceeds £25,000 in value, but you reach a settlement before the case is allocated, then you will not be able to recover anything other than fixed costs.   This obviously raises a number of issues, not least that this will surely discourage early settlement as Claimants are likely to hold off negotiating until they secure an allocation to the multi-track. However, on the flip side, we may see Defendant’s making early, and realistic, Part 36 offers in order to try and avoid such a scenario.   bSquared...

| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
Client due diligence by SPONSOR Aon The way that a firm handles new matters is absolutely key to the long-term success and viability of the firm. Client Due Diligence (CDD) is one important aspect of handling new instructions. If you don’t meet all your compliance obligations, it is likely that there will be shortcomings in other areas of your service. Poor practices will be replicated across the firm. If corners are cut, claims and complaints may result. Sometimes corners are cut with the intention of filling in the gaps later but that rarely happens. If such practices are picked up by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA), then there may also be regulatory consequences.   By contrast, where matters have been started on the right foot, it’s much less likely that things will go off the rails later. In most cases, well-managed files do not give rise to negligence claims.   Effective CDD helps firms to identify and avoid suspicious transactions, making it a very potent weapon in the fight against money laundering. When determining the potential for criminal activity, a risk-based approach is required. There’s a lot of attention at the moment, from the Government down, on professional enablers, of which there are four main types: the first two types are those actively complicit or negligently involved in the transfer of money through client accounts. Then there are those who cut corners, perhaps running matters on miscellaneous files to avoid file opening requirements and those who are unwittingly involved.   The SRA published its thematic review of money laundering in May 2016. Many of the 252 firms involved reviewed their processes as a result of the visit. After all, there’s nothing like a knock on the door from the regulator to make you dust off your procedures manual. Of course, the vast majority of firms haven’t received such a wake up call. 640 money laundering incidents involving firms have been reported to the SRA over the last four ye...

| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
Legal Update - The Third Parties (Rights Against Insurers) Act 2010 By Ian Peacock and Nicholas Saunders, Professional Indemnity Insurance Specialists at Bond Dickinson LLP.   Bringing claims against insured defendants – the new regime   The Third Parties (Rights Against Insurers) Act 2010 (the 2010 Act) came into force on 1 August 2016 and is intended to simplify how claims are brought against defendants who have (or may have) insurance cover. In this article Ian Peacock and Nicholas Saunders of Bond Dickinson LLP explain the implications of the 2010 Act, and why practitioners need to be alive to this legislative development.   The Third Parties (Rights Against Insurers) Act 2010 (the 2010 Act) modernises and simplifies the Third Parties (Rights Against Insurers Act) 1930 (the 1930 Act).   The old regime - the 1930 Act   The 1930 Act was introduced to provide claimants who were seeking to establish a liability against an insolvent person or corporate entity with a direct route of recovery against any relevant insurance cover (such as professional indemnity or employer's liability), thereby addressing the problems previously created for claimants by the English law principal of privity of contract.   Previously, this principal meant that any insurance claim and responsive indemnity fell within the insolvency (there being no contractual relationship between the claimant and the insurer and the insolvent entity providing the requisite nexus). The practical effect was that competing claims to the funds could arise, serving to reduce or extinguish a claimant's recovery.   The 1930 Act was largely successful in terms of meeting its objectives. However, it also gave rise to a number of practical problems from a claimant's perspective including that: ŸBefore a claimant could bring a claim against an insurer, it was first necessary to establish liability against the insolvent defendant. In the case of a dissolved corporate entity, this required...

| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
DASLS Autumn 2017 Diary Dates DASLS 6TH ADMISSIONS CEREMONY on Monday 9 October 2017 from 5.30 p.m. at the Guildhall in Exeter   If you qualified, or will qualify, between 1st September 2016 and 30 September 2017, please contact Monique Bertoni at DASLS office to make sure you receive your personal invitation nearer the time. monique@dasls.com DASLS DINNER IN TAUNTON on Friday 3 November 2017 at the Somerset County Cricket Club.   All DASLS members and their guests are warmly invited. Watch out for details nearer the time....

| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
Lord Justice Briggs - Taking the "A" out of ADR Frances Macdonald Member of DASLS Mediation Sub-Committee LORD JUSTICE BRIGGS - MEDIATION TO BECOME PART OF THE CULTURE OF LITIGATION TAKING THE "A" OUT OF ADR Last summer Lord Justice Briggs completed a review of Civil Litigation including the use of Mediation to resolve disputes. Following his review LJ Briggs gave a speech to the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators in September 2016 upon which this article is based, concentrating on his review of Mediation.   LJ Briggs Review of Mediation showed that the real gap in Mediation and ADR use was in cases of a value of £10 to £200 thousand in particular in personal injury and clinical negligence cases. The review found that (unsurprisingly) there had in fact been a rise in mediation following the recent substantial court fee rises.   LJ Briggs concluded that there needed to be a litigation system that was accessible to litigants in person or with minimal help from lawyers in cases up to the value of £25 thousand. This would include rules being kept simple.   LJ Briggs proposed 3 main stages: 1. Stage 1 – in which details of the case would be inputted onto the online system explaining the case and with the opportunity to upload key documents and evidence. The online system will prompt them to explain the case in such a way that the Court can ascertain the key points.   2. A resolution stage – This would be led by a Court office who could be a “Case Officer” or a legally qualified ‘Case Lawyer”. The Case Lawyer would not be a Judge.   The Case officer of Case Lawyer would suggest one of the following options as appropriate:   a.  Short telephone or online mediation in simple cases – including newly emerging forms such as automated bidding   b. An Early Neutral Evaluation (ENE) by a District Judge   c. Arrange a modest cost private mediation in a Court centre   d. A full day private mediation in higher value, difficult or em...

| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
Raising the Profile By Tony Steiner, DASLS Executive Director One of the aims of DASLS is to promote the solicitors’ profession. To this end there has been an ongoing marketing and PR campaign that, in conjunction with the Legal awards, has significantly increased the profile of DASLS and its members. We are now looking to build on this success and are putting in place a new marketing plan for the next twelve months.   One of our ambitions is to become the ‘go to’ organisation for legal comment. We will be engaging with local editors and media to raise their awareness of DASLS and its role with an invitation for them to contact us regarding any news stories with a legal perspective.   To help us achieve this we need a directory of members from all areas of practice and locations who are, from time to time, willing to speak to journalists and able to comment on the Society’s behalf. Part of the role would be to assist us cultivate the links to the media.   Please let me know if you would be interested in this opportunity and if so which areas of practice you would be able to comment on. tony@dasls.com or 01392 366444...

| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
Cook's & Hatchard's Law Prize 2017 Nominations Invited NOMINATIONS INVITED!   The Prize - Guidance   To be eligible for The Prize the nominee must have completed their training contract or a substantial part thereof in the Somerset area in the past twelve months and have obtained honours at the academic stage and/or have (in the judgement of the Trustees) shown merit throughout their training.   The definition of Somerset for the purposes of the prize, includes Sherborne and the local government administrative areas of Bath and NE Somerset, North Somerset and, of course, Somerset.   The specific objects of the charity are available upon request from DASLS.   Nominee's Personal Information   Please give full details of the person whom you are nominating and confirm that they are content for their details to be publicised by DASLS including photographs, should they be successful.   Please submit your name and work contact details, title and why you are nominating this person.   The Trustees are looking both for academic achievement prior to or during their training along with other examples of “merit”. This may include (by way of illustration only) distinctions at LPC, First Class Honours at Graduate level, initiative in the workplace or community/charity based projects and engagement that, for example, raises the positive profile of the profession, supports other young lawyers or the wider community.   Please give specific examples of how the nominee has exceeded the normal expectations of a trainee who is building their career. In short, the successful nominee will have shown real “merit” and not only achieved what is expected.   It would be helpful to the Trustees, when considering the nomination, to have as much information about the nominee’s achievements as appropriate.   Summary   The Trustees wish to encourage eligible nominees to have their names put forward as the award is prestigious and well recognised ...

| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
2017 Legal Sunday Service Exeter Cathedral Each year, DASLS members receive an open invitation from the High Sheriff of Devon to attend this most important event during the legal year in Devon. The High Sheriff for 2017/18 will be Heleen Lindsay-Fynn. Solicitors can either take part in the Procession which this year will depart from The Castle, or simply attend the Service at Exeter Cathedral. Procession Dress: Full robes and uniforms. Solicitors please note that while preferable, it is not essential to wear a gown to be able to process. Format: Facilities for robing will be available at The Castle Guests are asked to limit any requests for additional seats in the Cathedral to two. Such requests should be made when replying and will be subject to the availability of places in the Cathedral. Further information will be sent nearer the date. In order to deal with all the complex arrangements, please contact Monique Bertoni at DASLS office by Friday 28 April at the latest if you wish to attend. Further information will be sent nearer the time. Thank you for your cooperation. The Cap of Maintenance In 1497 Exeter's citizens successfully resisted the rebel army of Perkin Warbeck, who besieged Exeter in his bid to win the English throne from Henry VII. Grateful for the city's loyalty, Henry awarded symbols of his special favour: the Cap of Maintenance and Ceremonial Sword. The original cap, a simple affair of black felt without a brim, may actually have been the king's own; it was intended to signify a close personal tie between the giver and the receiver. Nowadays it is believed to be enclosed within a richly embroidered brimmed version of crimson felt, bought in 1634 at a price of £21 and 'renovated' in 1766. This cap has recently been "retired" from day to day use as after more than 240 years, it was becoming too fragile to be regularly handled. It is however on permanent display at The Guildhall. In 2009, a replica of this Cap was made by Hand & Loc...

| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
Ethics Column: Ensuring Ethics is included in the Compliance Agenda Tracey Calvert Oakalls Consultancy Limited tcalvert@oakallsconsultancy.co.uk www.oakallsconsultancy.co.uk     ENSURING ETHICS IS INCLUDED IN THE COMPLIANCE AGENDA Compliance professionals are familiar with the concept of continuous assessment to evaluate how successfully they have addressed the various regulatory demands made of them and their firms by the SRA. They look at their breaches records, complaints data, dealings with the SRA and Legal Ombudsman and similar. The idea behind their introspection is to consider which, if any, of their systems and policies need fine-tuning, where their risk pinch points are, how to remedy hotspots, and how to develop areas of proven success. Compliance never stands still!   This is of course very sensible. The SRA likes to see evidence of this; the Handbook is littered with clues in words and phrases such as ‘evaluation’ and ‘monitoring’ and ‘continuous improvement’ which begs an answer to the following question: what have we learnt about ourselves and what could we do better or differently?   This year I would suggest an area of contemplation which should be added to this assessment process is a consideration of the ethical complexion of the firm. This is useful to ensure consistent and safe individual and firm wide professional behaviour and to facilitate ethical thinking in internal compliance schemes. There may be a temptation to think that compliance controls are all that are needed to create an ethical culture; in my view, this is a dangerous assumption and it is prudent for firm owners and compliance officers to understand the behaviours of their colleagues and, more specifically, be able to have confidence that their colleagues will make the right ethical choices.   It is perhaps understandable that basic ethics has been on the backburner in recent times. The changes in our relationship with our regulator have been colo...

| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
Legal Awards Winners 2017 Gallery Congratulations to our Legal Awards Winners 2017!   Team Awards INNOVATION Trowers & Hamlins incorporating Stones Sponsored by Solicitors Own Software Headline Partner CORPORATE & SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY TozersSponsored by PSG     LAW FIRM OF THE YEAR (1-10 Partners) Beviss & BeckingsaleSponsored by Aon LAW FIRM OF THE YEAR (11+ Partners) Clarke WillmottSponsored by Aon   TEAM OF THE YEAR Ashfords (Public Sector)Sponsored by Magdalen Chambers CLIENT SERVICE Bartons (Maritime Litigation)Sponsored by Exeter A Jockey Club Racecourse   Individual Awards   SOLICITOR OF THE YEAR Grace Bradley, The Family Law CompanySponsored by PKF Francis Clark LEGAL 'HERO' OF THE YEAR Tim Hook, Toller BeattieSponsored by Burcher Jennings   IN-HOUSE / PUBLIC SECTOR LAWYER OF THE YEAR Sara Smith, Devon County Council   Sponsored by Conscious Solutions Limited SUPPORT TEAM MEMBER OF THE YEAR Gemma Sparks, The Family Law Company   Sponsored byThe University of Exeter   LEADER / LAW MANAGER OF THE YEAR Rachel Buckley, The Family Law Company   Sponsored by Brewin Dolphin LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD Michael Cosgrave, Wollen Michelmore   Sponsored by The Law Society  ALL PHOTOS by Pyramid Torbay Photography  http://www.pyramidtorbay.co.uk/...

| 05th September 2017 | Newsletters
President's Review By the time you read this, my last Review, I’ll have jumped out of a plane (probably), experienced the splendour of the second Legal Awards and Dinner (definitely), and been and gone to Barcelona without incident (hopefully).   My Presidential year has flown by, and I am a better, but more exhausted, man for it. But before I get into my final update, I should mercilessly plug my chosen Charity of the year, the North Devon Hospice, because it’s probably the last chance I’ll get!   I’m sure we all know someone who has been affected by terminal illness, in one way or another, and the support that the Hospice provides for patients and their families is absolutely phenomenal, but as you’d expect, it does come at a price. The Hospice has to raise over £4.5m every year, from scratch, and every penny raised really makes a difference.   I’ve been trying to contribute in numerous ways throughout the year: from taking part in quizzes, running across Exmoor on a freezing cold November morning, to stupidly agreeing to throw myself out of a plane. If you haven’t done so already, can you please all put your hands in your pockets one last time and help me support the Hospice; either that, or your generous donations will go towards my rehabilitation, if I’ve managed to break my arm/leg/dignity. Hopefully you won’t mind me posting the link to my Virgin Giving page: http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/MarkRoome. If you can, please give something; and if you can’t, go and have a word with the partner in charge of your department, as they’re clearly not paying you enough.   The last couple of months have been fairly busy, but March will be something of a pinch-point for me with numerous engagements and events all coming together, but you’ll have to wait and hear about most of them from your new President in May’s Review.   I’ll try and be brief, as you’ll also have to endure separately my President’s Report for the AGM pa...

Latest Events

Our Partners

Latest Jobs

Latest Training

Latest Social

Devon & Somerset Law Society

Local professional organisation for solicitors in Devon and Somerset providing training, recruitment, social events, mediation, complaints...

Exeter. 1-10 employees

Our Partners

Contact.

01392 366 333 info@dasls.com

Aston Court
Pynes Hill
Exeter
EX2 5AZ


Tel: 01392 366333

Contact Us Find US

Twitter.

LinkedIn.

Devon & Somerset Law Society

Local professional organisation for solicitors in Devon and Somerset providing training, recruitment, social events, mediation, complaints...

Exeter. 1-10 employees

Copyright © 2021 Devon & Somerset Law Society. All Rights Reserved. | Powered by WebBoss.io 3.6.5